Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019)

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The Best Practices in Companion Animal Transportation document was updated in 2019. Learn about the revisions and added content in this 4-part series.

All session have been approved for CAWA CEs.   Series:

1. Updated Animal Transportation Best Practices (10/16/19)

2. How to Implement the Transportation Best Practice Document (11/13/19)

3. Medical Aspects of Companion Animal Transport Programs (12/04/19)

4. Air & Emergency Transports and the Hub System (1/15/20)

  • 10/16/19 Updated Animal Transportation Best Practices

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 10/16/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    This first session in the 2019 series will provide a broad overview of the role of animal relocation programs and discuss the indications for various program models

    Animal relocation is an important tool in decreasing shelter crowding and saving more lives. In order to ensure safety, efficacy, and sustainability of relocation programs, consideration must be given to understanding state and local regulations. Animals selected for relocation should be carefully screened for physical and behavioral health, and programs should monitor and address stakeholder concerns proactively. This session will provide a broad overview of the role of animal relocation programs and discuss the indications for various program models, including key considerations to help decide if relocation is right for your agency and address general requirements for source and destination organizations. Recommendations will be presented in light of the updated Best Practices, a living document, designed to expand over time as community and animal needs adapt to societal changes and advancing knowledge of animal welfare.

    This is the first in a new 4-part updated Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019), based on the recently revised Best Practices document.

    Approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    Brad Shear, CAWA

    Executive Director, Potter League for Animals

    Brad Shear is the Executive Director of the Potter League for Animals.  Brad is one of two Certified Animal Welfare Administrators (CAWA) in the state of Rhode Island.  In addition to his work at the Potter League, Brad serves on the board of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement, chairing their Best Practices and Emerging Trends Committee for The Association and representing The Association on the board of the National Animal Rescue and Sheltering Coalition.  Brad also serves on the Hill’s Pet Nutrition Shelter Advisory Council, and the board of the Ocean State Animal Coalition.  Brad was a founder of the New York State Animal Protection Federation where he served as Board President for 7 years and continues to serve as the President of the Federation’s education foundation.  He previously served on the board of Community Works of New York State and is a past chair of the Tech Valley Nonprofit Business Council. Prior to leading the Potter League, Brad served for ten years as the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Mohawk Hudson Humane Society in Albany New York.  Brad was the Director of Operations for the Atlanta Humane Society, managed the Brooklyn Shelter for New York City Animal Care and Control, and began his animal protection career at the Humane Society of Boulder Valley in Colorado. 

    Karen Walsh, CAWA, LVMT, CFE

    Director, Animal Relocation, ASPCA

  • 12/04/19 Medical Aspects of Companion Animal Transport Programs

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 12/04/2019 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    Learn about best practices in medical oversight of companion animal transport programs. This program has been approved for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval.

    Learn about best practices in medical oversight of companion animal transport programs.  The role of the veterinarian and veterinary team start at the planning stages of a transport program, with a need for robust medical protocols at all stages in the transport process.  We'll review how to implement effective shelter medicine practices to mitigate disease risk in transport programs and how to use a strong communication system to troubleshoot any medical concerns that arise.

    This session is part of the Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019) (coming soon) AND part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    This program has been approved for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval (both Interactive-Distance and Non-Interactive-Distance). 

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.

    Dr. Erin Doyle

    Senior Director of Shelter Medicine, ASPCA

    Dr. Erin Doyle is a Senior Director of Shelter Medicine in the Shelter Medicine Services team within the ASPCA’s Shelter Outreach division.  The Shelter Medicine Services team provides shelter medicine expertise and consultation both internally and with the ASPCA’s external shelter partners.  Dr. Doyle is board certified in Shelter Medicine Practice through the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners.     

    Dr. Doyle received her DVM from Tufts University in 2004 and spent three years immediately following graduation in general small animal practice in Worcester, Massachusetts.  Dr. Doyle left private practice to join the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) where she worked for over ten years.  During her tenure at the ARL, Dr. Doyle was promoted to the head of the shelter medicine department and assisted with the forensic and law enforcement program.  She also completed a fellowship with the Koret Shelter Medicine program at UC Davis in 2012.  Dr. Doyle is serving her second term as president of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and is an adjunct faculty member in Shelter Medicine at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University.