The Association Innovation Bank

Product not yet rated

  • Register
    • Animal Welfare Professional Member - Free!
    • Student Member - Free!
    • Industry Partner Member - Free!
    • Learning Non-member - $50
image

Share this content with your staff, board, and volunteers at staff meetings or lunch 'n learns! Or watch on your own anytime. This series will add sessions throughout Fall 2020 so check back.

  • Applying and Tracking Pet Retention Techniques

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 09/08/2020

    Receive the tools you need to implement pet retention initiatives and track and report the data on your efforts. Whether you are just looking to adjust your conversation with those calling to surrender or if you are creating or improving your own help line, this session will help your organization's pet retention efforts.

    image


    The Kentucky Humane Society pioneered their free Pet Help Line in 2013, with one part-time employee. Resources and information were gathered, handouts created, calls answered and tracked, and reporting done each month. In the first year, less than 1,000 clients were assisted. Since those humble beginnings, the department has grown exponentially, and in 2018, over 14,000 clients were assisted through over-the-phone counseling or referrals, as well as financial aid to low-income families for veterinary services, behavioral resources, apartment pet deposits and more.

    Pet Help Line counselors typically begin each call with “tell me a little more,” encouraging callers to open up about their unique circumstances and what frustrations or barriers they are experiencing, so that the team can best help them and their pets and reduce shelter intakes. The data collected by the Pet Help Line has demonstrated the need for and effectiveness of financial aid vouchers and has attracted grants for this priority. It also led to KHS opening a low-cost wellness clinic in 2017.

    In this webinar, you will receive the information and tools you need to implement pet retention initiatives and track and report the data on your efforts. Whether you are just looking to adjust your conversation with those calling to surrender or if you are creating or improving your own help line, this session will help your organization's pet retention efforts!

    Read this blog about the program: Are You Doing These 3 Things To Help Keep People & Pets Together?

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Shelby Schulz, MPA

    Community Outreach Manager, Kentucky Humane Society

    Shelby came to the Kentucky Humane Society in 2014, after four years working a crisis line for a local domestic violence shelter. Having worked as a Crisis Intervention Counselor right out of college, Shelby came to the Kentucky Humane Society with experience in assisting clients in emotional and urgent situations as well as how to track and report data on the success of a program. After a year as a KHS admissions clerk, and with a new master’s degree in nonprofit management, she was promoted to Pet Help Line Coordinator. Shelby implemented data tracking, program changes and initiatives that increased the scope and achievements of the Pet Help Line. As a result of the growing program and Shelby’s ingenuities in her department, she was promoted to Pet Resource Manager. She now supervises three full time employees to handle the ever-increasing call volume and meeting various needs of their clients. 

  • Creating a Network of Care Options for Cats

    Recorded On: 03/23/2020

    Learn how Denver Metro Denver CAT invested in solutions to target the cat problem at its source.

    image


    The animal welfare field has established effective models for providing high-volume spay/neuter, but many communities still face barriers to accessing these and other services for cats. What if we invested upfront in common-sense solutions to target this problem at its source?  Can we disrupt the status quo for cats and transform our organizations and communities?

    Learn about a project called Metro Denver CAT, which was created  to answer these questions. The program uses a collaborative system, bridging gaps in our community and creating a network of care options for cats. This community outreach program connect residents to  services, filling in gaps where needed. Anna Murrin, project manager at Metro Denver CAT, will share what her team has learned by implementing a structured, methodical community-based cat project, and discuss ideas to consider at your organization. 


    Read this blog about the program: coming soon


    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Anna Murrin

    Project Manager

    Metro Denver CAT

    Anna Murrin is the project manager for Metro Denver CAT, where she has worked on designing and implementing effective solutions to cat overpopulation and welfare concerns since 2016. Her experience in animal welfare has focused on a variety of outreach-based programs, including spay/neuter outreach with the ASPCA in New York City, and she is passionate about connecting directly with communities to help people improve the lives of the animals in their care.

  • Kitten College

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 04/07/2020

    Learn about the Animal Welfare League of Arlington's kitten nursery training program.

    image


    Neonatal kittens are the most euthanized animals in shelters today and therefore have become the focus of shelters looking to increase their live release rates. In 2017, the Animal Welfare League of Arlington (VA) took a storage closet, $10K, and one staff person and created an in-house kitten nursery that increased its intake of kittens by 400% while maintaining a live release rate of 92%. 

    Your organization can learn from AWLA's success. Learn how they created the nursey, engage and support a specialized foster group, and use social media to take the pressure off of their staff.

    Read this blog about the program.

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about other Innovation Bank sessions.

    Marnie Russ

    National Kitten College Program Administrator, The Animal Welfare League of Arlington

    As National Kitten College Program Administrator, Marnie Russ developed and runs the Kitten College at the Animal Welfare League of Arlington.  She was also a co-founding member of the National Kitten Coalition. 

  • Dog Day Foster and Field Trip Programs

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 03/30/2020

    Maddie's Fund will show you how field trip programs affect dogs’ well-being and how your organization can start and run your own program.

    image

    Pre-COVID, Animal welfare organizations were increasingly using field trip programs to engage with their communities, find adopters and foster caregivers, and enrich the lives of the dogs in their care. In this webinar, you’ll learn how field trip programs affect dogs’ well-being and how your organization can start and run your own program once it's safe to do so. 

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall and Winter 2020.

    Read this blog about the program.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Kelly Duer

    Foster Care Specialist, Maddie's Fund

    As Foster Care Specialist for Maddie’s Fund, Kelly's focus is on helping shelters and rescue organizations increase lifesaving through the implementation of robust foster care programs. Her role includes creating and providing training for organizations and their foster coordinators, writing, assisting with research on foster care and consulting with shelters. Her work with foster care and marketing has been featured in many national publications, websites and networks, including Animal Sheltering magazine, the Huffington Post, Best Friends magazine, BarkPost, Catster Magazine, iheartdogs.com, HuffPost Live and Fox News.

  • Emergency Animal Sheltering

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 06/09/2020

    Oregon Humane Society shows you how to grow a team of staff and volunteers trained to assist in protective custody sheltering and emergency response.

    image


    Oregon Humane Society will provide you with the information you need to replicate their emergency sheltering certification programs in your shelter and grow a team of staff and volunteers trained to assist in protective custody sheltering and emergency response. We will explain how staff and volunteers qualify to participate, the web-based and FEMA trainings they must complete and, as a final step to certification, how we conceptualize and conduct mock emergency drill scenarios. We will share our processes for announcing emergency deployment, team selection, and travel planning, as well as examples of how these deployments create valuable media and development opportunities.

    Read this blog about the program.

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read the blog:  Tips for Growing a Robust Emergency Animal Sheltering Team

    Read other blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Jennifer Barta, CVA

    Volunteer Resources and Humane Education, Sr. Manager, Oregon Humane Society

    With over 20 years of experience in education, animal welfare and volunteer management, Jennifer is currently responsible for a variety of programs that engage more than 6,000 volunteers annually. During her time at the Oregon Humane Society, she formalized the Second Chance program that now transfers nearly 8,000 at-risk pets annually from partner shelters to OHS for a second chance at a loving home. 

    Working in collaboration with the OHS Investigations team, she helped develop a curriculum to train and certify staff and volunteers in Emergency Animal Sheltering, EAS. The group now includes 125 members who are among the first to be called during disasters and to assist with large scale rescues in Oregon led by the OHS Investigations team. OHS’s EAS team is frequently recruited by national and international partners to help during disasters and ongoing rescues. Under Jennifer’s leadership, 56 teams have deployed in the past four years to assist during Hurricanes Maria, Florence, Harvey and Irma, plus the recent Camp Fire in California.

    Lila Obeng, CPES

    Investigations Coordinator, Oregon Humane Society

    Lila has been with the Oregon Humane Society for over 13 years and in her current position as an Investigations Coordinator since March 2012. Since beginning her position in the Humane Investigations Department, Lila has been the liaison between the Oregon Humane Society Technical Animal Rescue Team (OHSTAR) and Humane Investigations. Lila became a Certified Property and Evidence Specialist in 2015 and is currently one of two evidence technicians for the department.

    Throughout her time with the OHS Humane Investigations Department, Lila has helped create and implement dozens of training opportunities for not only OHS staff and volunteers, but also for other law enforcement agencies, veterinary practices, law students, legal professionals, and animal welfare organizations. Topics that Lila has been involved in the training and certification for are Criminal Justice Information Systems (CJIS), Law Enforcement Database System (LEDS), confidentiality, evidence handling and processing, chain of custody, large scale animal seizure, search warrants, trial testimony, veterinary forensics, crime reporting and others.  Lila has been an OHS certified Emergency Animal Shelter (EAS) staff member since February 2013 and involved evidence collection and chain of custody documentation for several OHS criminal case EAS operations. 

  • Expanding Your Reach through Education

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 02/28/2020

    Learn what humane education is and why it is an effective way to achieve your organization’s mission.

    image


    HEART will discuss what humane education is and why it is an effective way to achieve your organization’s mission. We will provide examples of the power of humane education, and explain how our freely available HEART Network can support you in initiating or expanding a humane education program. 

     Read this blog about the program: coming soon

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Kim Korona

    Senior Program Director, HEART

    Kim Korona has been working in the humane education field for 13 years. With H.E.A.R.T. she has taught K – 12 students and designed in-school, after school, and summer camp programs. Additionally, she has developed educational resources for educators, created and facilitated professional development workshops and courses, and provides humane education webinars. For several years she conducted humane education and humane living workshops for the Institute for Humane Education. Kim has presented at various professional development conferences such as the WNET conference, the Santana Learning Conference, and the Association for Professional Humane Educators (APHE) Conference. She previously worked for the Michigan Humane Society (MHS) where she reached about 9,000 students in three years. She expanded the MHS humane education offerings by developing an anti-violence program and summer camps, among other lessons and activities focused on reducing animal homelessness and increasing responsible animal guardianship. She created and provided their first ever adult humane education presentations and trained volunteers to offer the presentations as well. She received her M.Ed from Cambridge College in affiliation with the Institute for Humane Education, along with a Certificate of Humane Education from the Institute for Humane Education and earned her B.A. from Goddard College via Green Mountain College in Vermont. 

  • Families First

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 08/26/2020

    ​Learn about how a Bring Your Child to Work Program is supporting staff and find out how you can set one up in your organization.

    image

    When the pandemic first hit, Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando regularly asked staff what they needed and how they were doing. Their top 3 concerns? Their safety, their paycheck, and their families. In order to fully support employees who needed a safe space for their children to finish up the school year remotely, the Florida agency set up a Bring Your Child to Work Program. Learn about the program and how you can set one up in your organization.

    Read this blog about the program.

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Fraily Rodriguez

    Vice President of Operations, Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando

    Fraily Rodriguez started in animal welfare as a Humane Educator in 2006. Through the years, he has fallen in love with the work at Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando, and has led the agency in an amazing transformation. He played a huge role in starting summer camps, increasing volunteer hours, starting a customer care center and increasing the save rate of an 80 year old agency. He currently oversees the operations including 2 shelters, 3 clinics, outreach, volunteer management, strategic planning, Customer Care Center, IT and much more. He has guided the agency into a 21st-century leader in animal welfare. He is a seasoned professional with over 20 years of experience in nonprofit management and possesses a B.S. Degree in Counseling. His professional affiliations include Chairman, Westside Tech Veterinary Advisory Board, Graduate of Leadership Orlando Class 80, and a volunteer in several nonprofits throughout the area

  • Feline Leukemia Adoptions

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 02/19/2020

    Learn how one organization educates and empowers adopters and staff towards FeLV+ adoptions.

    image


    Feline Leukemia (FeLV) is the cause of a variety of diseases and is impossible to cure. Learn how Tree House Humane Society in Chicago educates and empowers adopters and staff towards FeLV+ adoptions.  Find out what FeLV is and isn't, including FeLV myths that keep cats from getting adopted. Learn how open adoption helps FeLV+ cats get adopted and hear how to get your staff onboard with FeLV+ adoptions.

    Read this blog about the program: coming soon

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Danielle Case

    Shelter Manager, Tree House Humane Society

    Danielle Case is the Director of Operations at Tree House Humane Society in Chicago. She enjoys thinking and collaborating on ways shelters will continue to grow and transform into the future.

  • The Forgotten Pets of Domestic Violence

    Recorded On: 01/14/2020

    RedRover will show you how your shelter can support your local domestic violence shelter and create life-saving partnerships for both people and their animals.

    image

    Your shelter (and you!) are a resource for your community. Animal sheltering is very much a social service that is expanding to meet the different needs of the public. In this session RedRover will explain our mission to protect the pets of domestic violence.  You will learn how your shelter can support your local domestic violence shelter and create life-saving partnerships for both people and their animals. We’ll focus on creating strong community relationships and how to get creative with your shelter space to accommodate the most vulnerable of pets.

    Intended audience: Frontline Staff, Middle Management, Senior Management/CEO, Board Members, Volunteers

    Read this blog about the program.

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Devon Krusko

    Field Services & Outreach Coordinator, RedRover

    Devon Krusko is the Field Services & Outreach Coordinator for RedRover. Her work in animal welfare spans 10+ years and encompasses shelter management, emergency response, and animal control. She has spoken throughout New England on shelter enrichment, animal behavior, and best transport practices. She is passionate about strong community partnerships and progressive programs that keep pets with their people.

  • The Genomics of the American Mutt

    Product not yet rated Recorded On: 02/11/2020

    The researchers launched Darwin’s Dogs, a citizen science project that collects behavioral information and DNA from pet dogs, regardless of their ancestry, to better understand difficulties in visual breed identification.

    image

    Dogs in animal shelters must be placed into their new homes based on limited information about their personalities. This information is often supplemented by guesswork based on whether the dog’s appearance suggests particular breed ancestry. To better understand the influence of genetics and ancestry on canine behavior, we launched Darwin’s Dogs, a citizen science project that collects behavioral information and DNA from pet dogs, regardless of their ancestry. To better understand difficulties in visual breed identification, we collected breed guesses about 21 extremely mixed-breed dogs on the website MuttMix.org.

    This 30-minute presentation was originally part of the National Council on Pet Population Research Symposium 2019.

    Read this blog about the program. (Coming soon)

    This webinar recording is part of the new Innovation Bank. The Innovation Bank is a collection of bright ideas, innovative programs, and research that your organization can use for inspiration. Recorded sessions will be added to the series throughout Fall 2020.

    Read blogs about Innovation Bank sessions.

    Jessica Hekman

    Postdoctoral Associate, The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

    Jessica graduated from Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in 2012 with a DVM and a MS in Comparative Biomedical Sciences. She completed an internship with the Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida in 2013. She completed a PhD at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in Animal Sciences (Genetics, Genomics, and Bioinformatics) in 2017. She currently studies behavioral genomics of pet and working dogs at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, where she is a postdoctoral associate.