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  • 12/04/19 Medical Aspects of Companion Animal Transport Programs

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/04/2019 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    Learn about best practices in medical oversight of companion animal transport programs. This program has been approved for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval.

    Learn about best practices in medical oversight of companion animal transport programs.  The role of the veterinarian and veterinary team start at the planning stages of a transport program, with a need for robust medical protocols at all stages in the transport process.  We'll review how to implement effective shelter medicine practices to mitigate disease risk in transport programs and how to use a strong communication system to troubleshoot any medical concerns that arise.

    This session is part of the Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019) AND part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    This program has been approved for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions that recognize RACE approval (both Interactive-Distance and Non-Interactive-Distance). 

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.

    Dr. Erin Doyle

    Senior Director of Shelter Medicine, ASPCA

    Dr. Erin Doyle is a Senior Director of Shelter Medicine in the Shelter Medicine Services team within the ASPCA’s Shelter Outreach division.  The Shelter Medicine Services team provides shelter medicine expertise and consultation both internally and with the ASPCA’s external shelter partners.  Dr. Doyle is board certified in Shelter Medicine Practice through the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners.     

    Dr. Doyle received her DVM from Tufts University in 2004 and spent three years immediately following graduation in general small animal practice in Worcester, Massachusetts.  Dr. Doyle left private practice to join the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) where she worked for over ten years.  During her tenure at the ARL, Dr. Doyle was promoted to the head of the shelter medicine department and assisted with the forensic and law enforcement program.  She also completed a fellowship with the Koret Shelter Medicine program at UC Davis in 2012.  Dr. Doyle is serving her second term as president of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and is an adjunct faculty member in Shelter Medicine at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University.

  • Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019)

    Product not yet rated

    The Best Practices in Companion Animal Transportation document was updated in 2019. These four webinars will help you understand the document and how to use it.

    The Best Practices in Companion Animal Transportation document was updated in 2019. Learn about the revisions and added content in this 4-part series.

    All session have been approved for CAWA CEs.   Series:

    1. Updated Animal Transportation Best Practices (10/16/19)

    2. How to Implement the Transportation Best Practice Document (11/13/19)

    3. Medical Aspects of Companion Animal Transport Programs (12/04/19) [approved for RACE CE]

    4. Urgent Transport: Moving Large Numbers of Animals by Air and Land (1/15/20)

  • 01/15/2020 Urgent Transport: Moving Large Numbers of Animals by Air and Land

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/15/2020 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    Let’s discuss emergency and air transports and the use of the hub system on an urgent timeline. This is the final session in a 4-part Transport Best Practices series.

    Not everything goes according to plan! Let’s discuss emergency and air transports and the use of the hub system on an urgent timeline.

    Rather than letting perfect get in the way of good, we will examine how to safely and effectively move large numbers of animals during an emergency. We’ll also talk about how to implement a hub system to save lives during disasters (both natural or man-made).  Attendees will take away ideas that will help them develop a process to conduct large-scale and emergency transports that emphasize the comfort and safety of each individual animal.

    This webinar is for any individual or group that cares for animals in a shelter setting or works/volunteers in animal welfare.

    This is the final session in a new 4-part updated Best Practices Webinar Series: Companion Animal Transport (2019), based on the recently revised Best Practices document.

    Approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    Kim Alboum

    Shelter Outreach and Policy Engagement Director, HSUS

    As HSUS Director of Shelter Outreach and Policy Engagement, Kim Alboum has worked to create nationwide partnerships resulting in the placement of thousands of animals that were victims of animal cruelty, natural disasters, and overcrowding. Kim also works with HSUS State Directors to strengthen relationships between community animal shelters and animal advocates. She created the Shelter Ally Project, an outreach initiative to connect strong progressive shelters with shelters in need of support and training. The program also allows for funding of HSUS partners to travel and mentor shelters in creating lifesaving programs and address the homeless pet population disparity nationwide. 

    Gina Gardner

    President, Humane Society of Tulsa

    Gina Gardner founded the Humane Society of Tulsa and uses her law degree to assist Oklahoma law enforcement and District Attorney offices in animal crimes including how to recognize them and obtain search warrants, execute humane seizure of animals, set a bond and forfeiture hearing and assist in the prosecution of offenders with evidence collection.  Gina manages the Tulsa County animal response team and is heavily involved in the Oklahoma state animal response team where her work in disasters has been recognized with awards by the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corp and US Department of Health & Human Services.  She has a decade of experience in pet transport and in 2018 established the Pet Transport Hub for Humane Society of Tulsa which has moved over 4000 pets from municipal shelters in Oklahoma and Texas to Shelter Ally Program partners.

  • 01/22/2020 Population Medicine and Effective Animal Disaster Response & Recovery

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/22/2020 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    We will address how shelters can use population medicine to ensure the welfare of animals while protecting public health during disasters. Pending RACE approval.

    Learn about activities that can be performed by shelters before, during, and after a disaster to build organizational resiliency and enhance recovery.  We will specifically address how population medicine is used to ensure the welfare of animals while protecting public health during disasters. Attendees will learn how to:  

    • Review shelter intake, triage, and common medical procedures necessary in animal disaster response and recovery
    • Develop protocols to be used by staff when caring for animals affected by a disaster
    • Identify resources needed to effectively respond and recover from a disaster
    • Formulate a plan to integrate operations with local disaster management efforts

    This session is part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    CEUS:

    • This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.
    • This program (both live and recorded) has been approved) for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize RACE approval.

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full. 

    Carla L. Huston, DVM, PhD, dipl. ACVPM

    Professor and Beef Extension Veterinarian, CVM Animal Disaster Response Coordinator, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University

    Dr. Carla Huston, DVM, PhD, dipl. ACVPM, is a member of numerous federal and state disaster management organizations and serves as the Veterinary Services branch leader for the Mississippi Animal Response Team (MART) under the state’s official response plan.  Locally, she serves as the chair of the county emergency planning committee (LEPC) and as a deputy with the county Sheriff’s Office for disaster management. As the coordinator of the CVM Animal Disaster Response Team, she leads deployments and conducts training in collaboration with MART, local first responders, veterinarians, and veterinary students. 

  • 02/12/20 Reducing Infection: Updates in Feline URI Management

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/12/2020 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    Learn about UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program's recent research on environmental and population health risk factors for feline upper respiratory disease in animal shelters.

    The UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program helps shelters reduce feline upper respiratory infection (URI) with integrative science-based solutions.  Whether it's housing modifications and facility design work, or implementation of the Capacity for Care(C4C) management model, shelters are seeing results with less URI, happier cats, better outcomes, and more balanced workloads for staff. The program has recently published research on how cage size and feline movement in and out of housing impacts feline URI, as well as the effects of the C4C model on feline health and outcomes. The researchers will share highlights from their findings, with an emphasis on day-to-day tools that will help prevent shelter cat URI now and into the future. Webinar attendees will: 

    • Become familiar with the basics of Capacity for Care and the role it plays in URI
    • Understand the connection between population management and feline health
    • Learn about the role of length of stay on URI and how everyone can help reduce URI risk in the feline population
    • Be shown that double compartment cage housing can meet the housing needs of most shelter cats – and discover how to achieve this with existing cage housing
    • Understand the essential elements of a “low stress” cage housing set-up
    • Learn humility to overcome those myths and mysterious practices we used to say must be done to prevent URI

    This session is part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    This program has been submitted (but is not yet approved) for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize RACE approval.

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.

    ​Cynthia Karsten, DVM, DABVP (Shelter Medicine Practice)

    Outreach Veterinarian, UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program

    Cynthia Karsten, DVM, DABVP is a Shelter Medicine Practice, Outreach Veterinarian with Koret Shelter Medicine Program, UC Davis. Dr. Karsten became board certified in Shelter Medicine Practice in 2017. Her main areas of interest include population management, infectious disease control, intake diversion/safety net programs, and providing affordable, accessible veterinary care in all communities. Dr. Karsten serves as a board member of and volunteers with the non-profits Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless, and Compassion Without Borders.

    Denae Wagner DVM, MPVM

    Assistant Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program

    Dr. Denae Wagner is the Assistant Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota.  She went on to complete a Farm Animal Population Health Residency and Masters in Preventative Veterinary Medicine (MPVM) at UC Davis.  She entered the field of Shelter Medicine in 2007 at UC Davis and loved it so much she stayed.  Her areas of special interest are shelter animal housing, facility design, and shelter-related research. 

    Denae Wagner DVM, MPVM

    Assistant Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program

    Dr. Denae Wagner is the Assistant Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota.  She went on to complete a Farm Animal Population Health Residency and Masters in Preventative Veterinary Medicine (MPVM) at UC Davis.  She entered the field of Shelter Medicine in 2007 at UC Davis and loved it so much she stayed.  Her areas of special interest are shelter animal housing, facility design, and shelter-related research. 

  • 02/26/20 Reduce Fear, Anxiety & Stress in Shelter Animals with Fear Free

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/26/2020 at 3:00 PM (EST)

    Learn how to clearly identify signs of fear, anxiety, stress and frustration in shelter animals in order to improve improve their overall welfare, mental health, and emotional well-being.

    Learn how to clearly identify signs of fear, anxiety, stress (FAS) and frustration in shelter animals. Veterinarians and shelter staff will discover how to modify various components of shelter life to reduce FAS and frustration in their shelter population. These Fear Free concepts will improve the overall welfare, mental health, and emotional well-being of both shelter animals and staff. Attendees will:

    • Learn to interpret canine and feline body language, behaviors, and motivations 
    • Understand and assess the impact of housing and environment (physical and emotional environment) on behavior and learning 
    • Learn how to minimize fear, anxiety, stress and frustration:
           o At intake
           o During daily care and husbandry procedures
           o During medical procedures
           o During the adoption process

    This session is part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    This program has been submitted (but is not yet approved) for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize RACE approval.

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.

    Dr. Wailani Sung, DACVB

    Veterinary Behaviorist, Behavior Specialty Clinic, San Francisco SPCA

    Dr. Wailani Sung obtained her master’s degree and Doctorate in Psychology in animal behavior as well as her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from The University of Georgia. She is a co-author of the book, “From Fearful to Fear Free” along with Dr. Marty Becker, Dr. Lisa Radosta, and Mikkel Becker. Dr. Sung is a contributor to the Fear Free Shelter program. Dr. Sung currently practices veterinary behavioral medicine at the Behavior Specialty Clinic located at the San Francisco SPCA.  

  • Shelter Medicine Series

    This series is a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

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    This series is a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement. The webinars are meant for both medical  staff and non-medical staff in shelters and animal control agencies. Webinars will be RACE-approved.

    BONUS!
    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.  

  • 04/01/20 Reporting Animal Cruelty: The Role of the Animal Welfare Professional

    Product not yet rated Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/01/2020 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    Animal welfare professionals will learn about their role and responsibility in reporting cruelty and neglect.

    Veterinarians and sheltering professionals are often the first contact for an animal who may have been abused or neglected.  However, many of these animal welfare professionals do not have the resources to identify the signs of abuse and/or neglect, the knowledge of where to report it, nor an understanding of the cruelty laws in their state.  After this webinar, you will be able to:

    • Identify the states where veterinarians are mandated to report animal cruelty/abuse
    • Understand the link between violence against animals and humans
    • Classify abuse
    • Recognize the roles and responsibilities animal welfare professionals have regarding cruelty
    • Know where to report cruelty

    Discover a resource for veterinarians which was a collaboration between Animal Folks (MN), ARL (MA), and the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Find out how they collaborated and get ideas for how you can create a similar resource for your state.

    This webinar will benefit veterinarians, veterinary technicians, animal advocates, and shelter/ rescue staff – especially leadership.

    This session is part of the Shelter Medicine series, a collaboration between the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

    This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 Certified Animal Welfare Administrator continuing education credit.

    This program has been submitted (but is not yet approved) for 1 hour of continuing education credit in jurisdictions which recognize RACE approval.

    BONUS!

    - Members of The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement who are vets or vet students may receive a free 1-year membership with the Association of Shelter Veterinarians (ASV).
    - Members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians may receive a free 1-year membership with The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement.

         >> Membership instructions will be sent after you attend your first webinar in full.

    Edward Schettino, DVM, PhD

    Vice President of Animal Welfare and Veterinary Services, Animal Rescue League of Boston

    Dr. Schettino is a graduate of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and is currently the Vice President of Animal Welfare and Veterinary Services at the Animal Rescue League of Boston. In addition to his doctorate in veterinary medicine, he has an MBA from Clark University’s Graduate School of Management, and both his Masters and PhD in the Basic Medical Sciences (Immunology), from New York University’s Graduate School of Arts and Science.  He has a strong passion for animal welfare and finding resources to keep pets and people together.